Cleaning Jewelry At Home

cleaning jewelry
cleaning jewelry


Unlike silver, gold doesn't develop a dull tarnished finish over time. However, gold can still easily accumulate dirt and grime with normal use. To restore the shine to your precious rings, bracelets, necklaces and other gold jewelry, you'll only need a few household tools and ingredients. The best way to clean your gold jewelry is by using a solution of warm water and detergent-free soap with a soft-bristled toothbrush or soft cloth. Gently, but thoroughly, brush your gold jewelry with the solution. Then, rinse the item(s) under luke warm water and dry with a soft cloth. Know when boiling is appropriate. Gold itself can be boiled with no problems. However, boiling delicate gemstones (like opals, pearls, coral, and moonstones) can cause them to crack or become damaged - especially if the jewelry is cold before boiling. Boiling is also a bad idea for jewelry with glued-in gemstones, as it can loosen the glue. However, if you're looking to clean heavily-soiled jewelry made entirely out of gold or gold jewelry that contains "strong" gemstones (like diamonds), boiling is a great choice.

 Bring water to a boil. You don't need to boil much water - just enough to submerge all of the jewelry in. As you're waiting for the water to boil, set your gold jewelry in a sturdy bowl or another vessel that won't be damaged by boiling water. Pyrex or metal cooking bowls/dishes are good choices. Arrange jewelry in the dish or bowl so that no piece of jewelry is covering up another piece - water should be able to reach every piece of jewelry.
cleaning jewelry
cleaning jewelry with cloth


 or you can use Aluminum Foil: To clean your jewelry, simply line a small bowl with aluminum foil. Fill the bowl with hot water and mix in one tablespoon of bleach-free powdered laundry detergent (not liquid), like Tide. Put the jewelry in the solution and let it soak for one minute. Rinse well and air-dry. This procedure makes use of the chemical process known as ion exchange, which can also be used to clean silverware.

 Carefully pour the water over your jewelry. Be very careful not to spill or splash by pouring too rapidly - boiling water can cause serious burns. When all of the jewelry is completely submerged, you've added enough water.

 Wait for the water to cool. When you can comfortably put your hands in the water, you can remove the jewelry. Follow a good boiling by scrubbing each piece of jewelry with a soft brush, then dabbing it dry with a soft towel and allowing it to sit and air-dry completely. Don't be afraid if the water appears dirty - this is good! As boiling water loosens the dirt, wax, grime, etc. that's built up on your jewelry, it may float to the surface of the water. The dirtier your water looks, the more dirt you've removed from your jewelry!
cleaning jewelry
shiny wedding ring


and other stuff you might not believe about their ability to bring back your jewelry sparkles:

Aluminum Foil: To clean your jewelry, simply line a small bowl with aluminum foil. Fill the bowl with hot water and mix in one tablespoon of bleach-free powdered laundry detergent (not liquid), like Tide. Put the jewelry in the solution and let it soak for one minute. Rinse well and air-dry. This procedure makes use of the chemical process known as ion exchange, which can also be used to clean silverware.

Baking Soda: To remove built-up tarnish from your silver, make a thick paste with 1/4 cup baking soda and 2 tablespoons water. Apply with a damp sponge and gently rub, rinse, and buff dry. To polish gold jewelry, cover with a light coating of baking soda, pour a bit of vinegar over it, and rinse clean. Note: Do not use this technique with jewelry containing pearls or gem-stones, as it could damage their finish or loosen any glue.

Beer: Get the shine back in your solid gold (i.e., minus any gemstones) rings and other jewelry by pouring a bit of beer (not dark ale!) onto a soft cloth and rubbing it gently over the piece. Use a clean second cloth or towel to dry.

Club Soda: Soak your diamonds, rubies, sapphires, and emeralds in club soda to give them a bright sheen. Simply place them in a glass full of club soda and let them soak overnight.

Denture Tablets: Has your diamond ring lost its sparkle? Drop a denture tablet into a glass containing a cup of water. Follow that with your ring or diamond earrings. Let it sit for a few minutes. Remove your jewelry and rinse to reveal the old sparkle and shine.

Ketchup: Let ketchup do the work of shining tarnished silver. If your ring, bracelet, or earring has a smooth surface, dunk it in a small bowl of ketchup for a few minutes. If it has a tooled or detailed surface, use an old toothbrush to work ketchup into the crevices. To avoid damaging the silver, don’t leave the ketchup on any longer than necessary. Rinse your jewelry clean, dry it, and it’s ready to wear.

Vinegar: Make your silverware—as well as your pure silver bracelets, rings, and other jewelry—shine like new by soaking them in a mixture of 1/2 cup white vinegar and 2 tablespoons baking soda for two to three hours. Rinse them under cold water and dry thoroughly with a soft cloth.

Vodka: In a pinch, a few drops of vodka will clean any kind of glass or jewelry with crystalline gemstones. So although people might look at you askance, you could dip a napkin into your vodka on the rocks to wipe away the grime on your eyeglasses or dunk your diamond ring for a few minutes to get it sparkling again. But don’t try this with contact lenses! Also avoid getting alcohol on any gemstone that’s not a crystal. Only diamonds, emeralds, and the like will benefit from a vodka bath.

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